Julian Assange Autobiography- A Review

Just finished reading this. I think it is as important as the tale of Steve Jobs, both based in technology, and in their own way, liberating and empowering the common man- in Jobs' case, maybe a common man who could afford the hardware.

WikiLeaks is of course what made him famous (or notorious to many) but his story is fascinating for its Tendulkar-like single-mindedness about the cause of justice for common people, and beyond boundaries of nations. It also is a look inside the media giants (not to mention governments)of the world, and how they choose to play certain roles.

Recently, I also read Vinod Mehta's memoirs, Lucknow Boy, and both the books are similar in a way. But the crusading zeal is more obvious in Assange, whether you like crusades or not. It (his crusade) started almost like the hippie generation, but this had a clearer purpose, I think. And technology seems to have been used without too many finding out how they were doing it.

Engrossing, and better than a whodunit.

Comments

Diamond Head said…
Thanks for leaking this ... will add it to the bucket list
Rajendra said…
Welcome. The problem with bucket lists in general is that they keep getting longer...

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